Solicitation of Prostitution

There is a wide range of sex crimes that a person can be charged with. Perhaps the most frustrating is ‘solicitation of prostitution’ because the legalities surrounding it are vague, confusing and controversial. For instance, there are countries across the globe where prostitution is legal and prostitution is even legal in the state of Nevada – but illegal in all of the other 49 states of the country. Even so, Nevada does limit it to certain counties. It is not legal statewide.

There are three broad categories of prostitution including escort, brothel and street prostitution and the severity of legal charges for this crime usually remains somewhere at the ‘misdemeanor’ level. It is considered to be an act of ‘public disorder’ for the most part and unfortunately tends to be the target of community shame and shunning as a means to ‘control’ if not prevent it from becoming entrenched in middle class America.

Yet, all indications are that prostitution is indeed the oldest profession in the world and a thriving industry as well – despite the fact that it is illegal. Some statistics show that profits from prostitution run into the tens of billions of dollars and that there is a surprising percentage of men who admit to utilizing the services of a prostitute at least once in their lives – and this admission includes seeking out homosexual prostitutes as well. Rarely discussed is the fact that a fair percentage of women also seek out the services of a prostitute as well.

The realities of this information should confirm that no amount of legal impunities will prevent or rid the world of prostitution. Laws have been enacted for years in an effort to curb and/or prevent prostitution. One example is a recent law signed by the Governor of Rhode Island in 2009 making the buying or selling of sexual services in that state a crime. But if you think that the states are the only one ‘getting into the act’ you’d be wrong. On numerous occasions that federal government has inserted itself into the battle to end prostitution. At one time or another -‘johns’ have been put on trial for everything from ‘slavery’ to tax evasion. Despite the best efforts of state and federal authorities, however, the sex trade continues to flourish and many believe that it will eventually become legal from coast to coast.

So what should you do if you are arrested for solicitation of prostitution or even for being accused of offering sexual favors in exchange for money? First, firmly and politely decline to say anything that will incriminate yourself. It is your constitutional right to remain silent – so do it. In this case – silence is golden.

Instead, request that a defense attorney be made available with whom you are able to discuss the situation and alternatives.